When Will The Desperate Quest For Physical Perfection Stop?

Gorgeousness-Quotient-Two-Models
Image Via Rogier

First we had IQ.
Then EQ came along.
Going by the current state of the world, we will soon have a new quotient: GQ aka Gorgeousness Quotient. Hmm. It sounds ridiculous. But wait, doesn’t it already exist?

Honestly, all it needs is a name because today way too many people are being judged―even valued―solely on the basis of their appearance. No doubt, looking presentable is important. But where must we draw the line? Who will decide the difference between grooming and obsession? Only time will tell.

17 thoughts on “When Will The Desperate Quest For Physical Perfection Stop?”

  1. I think this post is suggesting we don’t judge others and hold others to the standards of what is socially in.

    We each should work on our health and grooming but for ourselves, not because we are comparing ourselves to others or the media.

  2. I think we communicate through our appearance. For instance, if I let my body weight become obviously excessive, doesn’t that say something about my self-control with respect to eating and to exercise, and who knows what else.

    Yes, the media does inflict some totally unrealistic images on use, but I believe there is a reasonable point between unnatural media images and people who just don’t seem to care how they appear.

    1. You make a good point, but why should some additional weight have to say anything? A lack of self control is only one explanation. You could have a genetic tendency to a heavy build, or you could have developed a medical condition. Perhaps it is lack of self control, but caused by serious emotional issues. Perhaps your history explains very low self-esteem etc. etc.
      How do you know when somebody just doesn’t care , or whether they have a medical condition, or whether they have traumatic personal circumstances, or whether they have a mental issue, or whether they are just on their way home from their particular line of work………….. etc. etc.
      So what does poor (subjective term anyway) appearance really tell us?

      1. Data from the USA National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009–2010 2, 3

        More than 2 in 3 adults are considered to be overweight or obese.
        More than 1 in 3 adults are considered to be obese.
        More than 1 in 20 adults are considered to have extreme obesity.
        About one-third of children and adolescents ages 6 to 19 are considered to be overweight or obese.
        More than 1 in 6 children and adolescents ages 6 to 19 are considered to be obese.

        1. I don’t doubt those stats at all, but who is to say that it is purely carelessness or laziness or whatever. There are many reasons why an individual can gain excess weight and, from my perspective, it is simply shallow and ignorant to label them in any way simply because of their outward appearance.

          It was not that long ago that people in wheel chairs were considered 3rdrate citizens. Today? Well perhaps Stephen Hawking would have some comments to make on that!

          Canadian research has linked a high percentage of obesity cases to their educational level. Perhaps our schools should include more life skills (healthy eating) into the earlier programs. Low income individuals are limited somewhat in their choice of foods.
          Saying that a % of the population is obese is a verifiable fact but, on its own, says nothing about the individuals involved.

    2. We do, which is why it is important to take care of ourselves. After all, appearance is important and how we look on the outside impacts how we feel on the inside. Of course, some things are out of our hands, and we should try to be happy and satisfied with what we have…

      That does sound logical in theory. The problem is, we are being bombarded with so many” perfect” images that we inevitably end up feeling ashamed of our flawed selves. Even though we are aware that these images have been photoshopped, it is hard not to feel ashamed and dissatisfied. And although both men and women have to deal with this, things are far worse for us ladies :(

  3. I have to question your rationale that people are judged by appearance. You are generalizing in an area which cannot (and should not) be generalized. There are many people who either see through the superficial, or simply ignore it.
    Many businesses are legitimately focused on image simply because they have established a corporate image and wish their representatives to reflect such image. That is understandable.
    The fashion industry (like many others) is totally dependent on selling acceptance and self esteem from the use of their products.
    Am I less of a person because I still live in jeans? My self esteem says no. In fact my self esteem says that if you not want to get to know what a nice person I am, because I don’t meet your appearance/dress code… then that is your loss!
    Who will decide where to draw the line? An educated population will decide. They will know that, all other things being equal, looking good has nothing to do with value as a friend, nor with value to society.

    1. I wish my generalization was wrong, but it isn’t…and millennials and Generation Z are without a doubt, the the worst affected. Sure, narcissism and the focus on beauty has always been there, but things have really gotten out of control now. Case in point: the popularity of selfies and cosmetic procedures.

      “In fact my self esteem says that if you not want to get to know what a nice person I am, because I don’t meet your appearance/dress code… then that is your loss!”
      I totally agree with this statement and the one after, but unfortunately, narcissism has taken center stage. Take a look at this when you get a mo:
      http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/narcissism-the-science-behind-the-rise-of-a-modern-epidemic-a6925606.html

      1. With the greatest respect, your generalization is wrong, a fact which is supported by the UK article referred to.
        Perhaps it is simple careless use of the English Language but, when you say people do this/ do that, you are (by inference) saying all people, which is quite simply inaccurate.

        Better phrasing could “Many people” or Some people” or, if you have stats (e.g.) 80% of people” etc. etc.

        1. Article aside, I see way too many young people focus on taking “perfect selfies”.

          I surely never meant to say everyone is doing this! Thanks for pointing that out, I have made the change :)

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Life's better when you are aware of your surroundings.

Life's better when you are aware of your surroundings.

Sign up for a free membership to get all the inside info.

Thanks for subscribing! Please find the confirmation link in your mailbox.

Download this FREE book of 30 powerful affirmations to show your mental illness who's boss. GIMME IT!  SUPPORT ME